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Syringe needles pose health dangers, create eyesore by South LA Metro station

Those who work and live in the Florence-Graham neighborhood of South Los Angeles expressed concerns Wednesday about used syringe needles and trash scattered near a Los Angeles Metro light rail station.

Roberto Sanchez, who uses the Blue Line station to commute to work, said seeing needles on the ground in the area is nothing new. But last Friday was the first time he stepped on one of them.

“As soon as I touched the floor and hit the needle, I immediately felt a sharp pain and then a puncture,” Sanchez said. “The needle penetrated my shoe and hit my skin.”

Sanchez said, after the needle went through his skin, he went to the emergency room to get a tetanus shot and get blood work done. 

“When it comes to personal health, I always aim to make sure I’m healthy. But for something out of the way to happen to me and I have no control over, it’s very scary and it makes me feel very weak,” he explained.

Mary Hellen, who lives nearby the Florence-Graham station, said she and her friend have been picking up the abandoned neelds and throwing them in the trash.

“Me and her clean the street where we live. And it’s awful,” Hellen said. 

Los Angeles County Supervisor Holly Mitchell whose district includes the area said that the safety of residents in the area is “a top priority.”

“I will be working with Metro and other appropriate entities to see what immediate and long term action can be taken to address this,” Mitchelle said in a statement. 

The LA Metro said it’s looking to its city and county partners to keep sidewalks clean. Its statement read:

“Drug abuse is one the key societal issues plaguing the Los Angeles area and the nation overall, which affects not only those using the drugs, but everyone who must deal with the aftermath of what they leave behind. Metro’s dedicated and hardworking employees clean our buses, trains and stations. We look to our city and county partners to keep the city and county sidewalks clean and safe for Metro riders and all pedestrians.”


Source: NBC Los Angeles

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